info@kimura.store  |  30 day returns  |  lab tested  |  fast worldwide delivery

RUN with NMN

Study shows – NMN enhances the exercise endurance of runners.

Together with sports training, supplementing NMN improves the endurance performance of middle-aged athletes by improving aerobic capacity. From supplements to anabolic steroids, athletes around the world are constantly seeking ways to improve endurance and athletic performance. In recent years, we have accumulated a lot of research showing that supplementation with nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) can increase exercise endurance, at least in rodents. So, do these NMN-related exercise endurance benefits apply to humans? In a human test, Hu and his colleagues from Guangzhou Sport University published an article in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition that oral NMN powder can improve the aerobic capacity of adult runners-the consumption of oxygen by muscles.

More importantly, this NMN treatment also improves our skeletal muscles’ ability to use oxygen to produce energy more efficiently during endurance exercise. The results of Hu and colleagues support that NMN can improve exercise endurance by enhancing this skeletal muscle oxygen utilization capacity. Combining NMN with training improves endurance training To determine whether healthy middle-aged people can get similar benefits from NMN, Hu and colleagues supplemented runners with 300, 600, or 1200 mg/day of oral NMN powder for six weeks. During this period, the three dose groups were trained 5 to 6 times a week for 40 to 60 minutes each time, and then a cardiopulmonary (cardiopulmonary) exercise test was performed.

Endurance exercise tests have shown that doses of 600 and 1200 mg/day significantly increase the body’s ability to absorb oxygen and transport it to the tissues. Hu and colleagues also studied the effect of NMN on aerobic capacity, the ability of muscles to use oxygen from the heart and lungs to produce energy, and they found that these doses of muscle were improved compared to runners who did not take NMN. More importantly, the ventilation threshold—the point at which the breathing rate increases faster than oxygen absorption—was significantly improved when the 600 and 1200 mg doses were taken daily after training. These findings indicate that taking NMN outside of exercise can improve the body’s oxygen utilization capacity, especially at higher doses.


The study’s findings that NMN and training improve middle-aged runners’ oxygen utilization capabilities suggest that people can add NMN supplementation to their exercise regimens. Doing so may improve performance during training and could also increase endurance following weeks or months of training.